Grow Better Greens Podcast

Listen to the Grow Better Greens Podcast on iTunes, where experienced gardener Jenny teaches newbie Liz how to get the most out of her salad garden. We cover when and how to plant, as well as how to care for plants that we want to harvest the most nutrients possible from. T

Grow Better Greens Podcast, Season One:

Posted by on Jul 23, 2016 in Grow Better Greens Podcast | Comments Off on Grow Better Greens Podcast, Season One:

Here’s the deal: In 2015, my friend Liz and I joined forces and recorded the Grow Better Greens podcast to teach gardeners all about the advantages of using soil minerals to boost nutrients in their veggies.

Our All-Time Most Popular Episodes

Episode 5: What a Cow Can Teach a Vegan

Episode 12: Natural Pest Control in the Garden

Episode 13: Soil Minerals as Pest Control

Episode 19: 3 Secrets to Beyond Organic Greens

Episode 20: Foliar Feeding Schedule for Organic Gardeners

Episode 21: How to Compost the Easy Way


Grow Better Greens: The Big Idea

The big idea is that no matter your experience level (aka the color of your thumb), or even the types of veggies that you grow:

You can boost the nutrients per calorie in your homegrown food while simultaneously getting some relief from pest and disease pressure.

Super-healthy food comes from super-healthy plants – the kind of plants that have strong immune systems thanks to their ability to access the nutrients in their soil.

We talk about all of this and more on the show – though we’ve since parted ways as business partners. (We were selling seeds on Amazon as well as an online gardening course – but both ended up behind desks with 9 to 5 jobs!)

We are still great friends and I was able to land myself a job at an awesome seed company.

All Grow Better Greens Episodes:

Episode 1: Growing Vegetables with High Brix

Episode 2: How to Source Healthy Plants for a Healthy Garden

Episode 3: Start a Vegetable Garden the Healthy Way

Episode 4: Organic Vegetable Seeds: Are They Worth the Price?

Episode 5: What a Cow Can Teach a Vegan

Episode 6: Soil Amendments: Why Chemicals in the Garden Are Necessary

Episode 7: Growing Better Salad Greens

Episode 8: Making Homemade Leafy Green Powder

Episode 9: It’s Never Too Late to Start a Garden

Episode 10: Extreme Garden Weather

Episode 11: Organic Mulch and Living Mulch

Episode 12: Natural Pest Control in the Garden

Episode 13: Soil Minerals as Pest Control

Episode 14: Natural Garden Clean Up: What to Keep What to Pull

Episode 15: Vegetable Garden Planning

Episode 16: Planting Roots for Leafy Greens

Episode 17: The Best Greens Recipe

Episode 18: Preserving Greens for Future Recipes

Episode 19: 3 Secrets to Beyond Organic Greens

Episode 20: Foliar Feeding Schedule for Organic Gardeners

Episode 21: How to Compost the Easy Way

Episode 22: Interview with Megan Cain, The Creative Vegetable Gardener

Episode 23: How to Germinate Seeds

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How to Germinate Seeds

Posted by on Nov 15, 2015 in Grow Better Greens Podcast | Comments Off on How to Germinate Seeds

In this week’s episode, we’re going deep with how to germinate seeds, which can sometimes feel like a choose-your-own-adventure. Because all seeds are not created equal, we wanted to cover some basic practices, common misconceptions, and reliable resources for gardeners to turn to if they want to know more.

You can listen in here, or download for later:




Episode 24: Germination, Working With Different Plant Seeds

Why Start Your Plants From Seed At All?
Not All Seeds Behave Alike!
Back of the Seed Packet: Best Place for Info?
Plant Seeds Need: Time, Temperature, Agitation
Best Practices for Germination
Seeds Every Month Survey


And if you enjoyed our podcast, please help us spread the word by leaving your honest review on iTunes.

Want to win our collection of Free Heirloom Seeds?
Fill out our Quick Survey here about our new Seeds of the Month Club

Why Start Your Plants From Seed At All?

You’re about to find out some news that might sour you here and there on planting from seed. So, you might begin to wonder why you should even bother.

Of course, it’s can be so tempting to just resort to buying a whole garden’s worth of plants from a retailer. (Pssst: check out Episode 2 how to Source Healthy Plants for a Healthy Garden for great tips on buying transplants).

But don’t act too fast! Before we even mention a downside, you should know that there are three major upsides to starting your plants from seed:

  • The selection of varieties is WAY, WAY BIGGER!
  • Seeds are much cheaper than plants
  • Many plants are easier to start from seed – cucumbers for example struggle when transplanted

Not All Seeds Behave Alike!

Here’s where I gave Liz a pop quiz, trying to get her to figure out which seeds are easy, which are a little bit tricky, and then which ones are downright crazy to attempt to start from seed.

Unfortunately, it’s pretty hard to figure which fruits and veggies are tougher to start than others.

Peas, beans and radishes are all super simple. While lettuce is easy when you broadcast it, it can prove really difficult if you bury it too deep, as it needs light to germinate.

Peppers can take 2 weeks or longer to germinate, while tomatoes, which look so similar, sprout in closer to 5-10 days.

Both apples and potatoes are better started as ‘clones’, as their seeds rarely produce offspring that resemble the parent plant.

Florida Jack Pines and Giant Sequoia trees in the Redwood Forest both need exposure to fire in order to release their seeds from the tightly coiled pinecones.

Back of the Seed Packet, Best Place for Info?

Here’s where things get really tricky!

Of course, in many ways the back of your seed packet has some of the best info available, and that’s exactly what you should be consulting if you’re standing in the store shopping for seeds.

But there’s a catch: there’s only so much space available for the seed company to give you what they think is the best info, but all of that info is subject to some serious variables.

For example, if the packaging says that a seed may take from 7-21 days to sprout, what it might really mean is that it depends on how warm your soil is. OR, on how cold it is, depending on the seed’s temperature preference.

Because you’ll often need slightly more info than the packet can give you, it’s good to have a handy gardening book at the ready or to visit a couple of well-known websites to fill in the blanks. Here’s a favorite of ours:

http://:gardening.cornell.edu

Plant Seeds Need: Time, Temperature and Agitation

So, what do seeds want? What exactly are these variables that make for good germination (sprouting)?

Water: activates enzymes that begin the germination process and then water also delivers nutrition to the plant roots as they begin to develop. This downward growth actually occurs just before the teeny plant unravels itself and seeks out the sun. So, always make sure that you’re planting seeds in wet soil!
Time: all seeds have a different timeframe in mind, germination-wise. This is because some seeds have thicker, harder cases than others. They chose to put some energy into a longer-term storage plan, in hope that they might stay genetically viable for longer.
Temperature: really determines individuality: some seeds thrive in colder soil, like spinach and parsley. Others need warm soil temps, like peppers and tomatoes.
Agitation: what we’re really talking about here is how deep the seeds want to be planted. Do they need a quick route to the sun, or a longer time to be buried deep down, allowing their cases to be slowly softened by water?

So, you can see how much different variables matter when saying that a seed takes 7-21 days to germinate!

Germination IS the Goal

Our hope is that you use this info to craft a plan that improves your germination results.

With some good research on the seeds that you’re planting, you should be able to get veggies that sprout every time.

Here’s our favorite ‘recipe’ for getting seeds to germinate:

  • Always buy ‘fresh seed’; seed that was harvested within the past year
  • Always pre-moisten the soil before planting seeds
  • Soak your seeds in warm water for two hours
  • Cover freshly-planted seeds with germinating mix; a light and airy soil medium that works well with all seeds

Seeds Every Month Survey

Hey – we’re giving away free seed collections in exchange for 4 short answers from you!

We’re really excited to roll out our Seeds Every Month website shortly – think Seeds of the Month Club meets awesome online gardening classes (also delivered monthly!)

Each 6-seed collection will be paired with a short and sweet gardening class aimed at growing your knowledge – the fun way.

We would love for you to help us out by visiting our 4-question survey here – enter your email address and you could win free seeds!

Thanks for reading our blog : ) We appreciate your time and wish you much success in growing healthy food. Remember to enter your first name and email address below to access the FREE Video series.


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Have a Question? Leave us a quick voice message below!

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Interview with Megan Cain: The Creative Vegetable Gardener

Posted by on Oct 29, 2015 in Grow Better Greens Podcast, Interview | Comments Off on Interview with Megan Cain: The Creative Vegetable Gardener

In this week’s episode, we’re talking to Megan Cain, The Creative Vegetable Gardener from Madison, Wisconsin. Megan (our very first interviewee!) shares some of her best tips and tricks around preserving the harvest the easy way, using both the fridge and freezer. We also discuss her great line of Ebooks, which go beyond food preservation and into the realm of seed sowing and focusing in on specific crops, such as garlic, onions, and peppers. Learn more about Megan Cain and what she has to offer by clicking play below!

You can listen in here, or download our free podcast from the iTunes store. Want to learn to grow better greens yourself? Sign up for our FREE Video Series below:


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Episode 22:Megan Cain, the Creative Vegetable Gardener

(For a full transcript of our interview with Megan, click here…)

Where to find our more about Megan Cain
The Creative Vegetable Gardener Ebooks
Where to Find Carmen Peppers
Seeds Every Month Survey
Why Do You Grow Food?


And if you enjoyed our podcast, please help us spread the word by leaving your honest review on iTunes.

Want to win our collection of Free Heirloom Seeds?
Fill out our Quick Survey here about our new Seeds of the Month Club

And if you enjoyed our podcast, please help us spread the word by leaving your honest review on iTunes.

Where to Find Out More About Megan Cain

There are plenty of places to check Megan out online – her website, youtube, instagram, as well as other podcasts and interviews.

The Creative Vegetable Gardener E Books

You can find Megan’s Ebooks on her the Learning Center page of her website:

  • Super Easy Seed Starting
  • Super Easy Food Preserving
  • The Essential Guide to Growing Peppers
  • The Essential Guide to Growing Garlic
  • The Essential Guide to Growing Onions

Where to Find Carmen Peppers

As Megan and I discussed, we are both huge fans of Carmen Peppers…. and Jimmy Nardello, Red Marconi, Corno di Toro Rossa and all other Sweet Italian Frying Peppers!

Im fact, we both agree that Frying peppers are way sweeter with a taste more worth waiting for than traditional Bell peppers. They are the just the epitome of summer.

The tricky part, is where to find these varieties as seedlings in the springtime. Liz and I actually go over where and how to source the best seedling varieties each spring on Episode 2: How to Source Healthy plants for a Healthy Garden

The quick advice if your looking for heirloom varieties like Carmen, is to find a CSA farm by searching your zip code at LocalHarvest.org. CSA Farms often start way more field plants than they need – with the intention of selling the transplants to home gardeners.

They are often the best suppliers of properly-cared-for seedlings!

Seeds Every Month Survey

Hey – we’re giving away free seed collections in exchange for 4 short answers from you!

We’re really excited to roll out our Seeds Every Month website shortly – think Seeds of the Month Club meets awesome online gardening classes (also delivered monthly!)

Each 6-seed collection will be paired with a short and sweet gardening class aimed at growing your knowledge – the fun way.

We would love for you to help us out by visiting our 4-question survey here – enter your email address and you could win free seeds!

Why Do You Grow Food?

In this section we ask our listeners to share why they are growing food. This week Megan Cain shares her answer with us – thanks Megan!

Thanks for reading our blog : ) We appreciate your time and wish you much success in growing healthy food. Remember to enter your first name and email address below to access the FREE Video series.


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Have a Question? Leave us a quick voice message below!

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How to Compost the Easy Way

Posted by on Oct 22, 2015 in Grow Better Greens Podcast | Comments Off on How to Compost the Easy Way

Episode 21: How to Compost the Easy Way

If you haven’t already heard, due to large methane releases from food scraps in the US, composting may become entirely mandatory, as it already has here in my home state of Vermont. Don’t worry though, you can learn how to compost the easy way in this week’s episode. We discuss options to fit every lifestyle, whether you’re an apartment dweller, or full blown wanna-be worm farmer. We also discuss some unique business ideas that have come out of this big compost push.

You can listen in here, or download for later:




Want to win our collection of Free Heirloom Seeds?
Record your 90 second answer here to the question “Why Do You Grow Food?” – if we play your answer, all 6 of our favorite leafy greens are headed your way!

And if you enjoyed our podcast, please help us spread the word by leaving your honest review on iTunes.

Compost Basics – Mandatory, Main Ingredients

To begin our How to Compost the Easy Way conversation, we have to start out by mentioning that:

We expect the composting of food scraps and yard waste to become entirely mandatory in the United states.

Wait, what?

It’s true!

In fact, this law has already been enacted in my home state of Vermont.

Though current policies are targeting large scale food-scrap producers, such as hospitals, nursing homes, and food product businesses, the intention is to eventually get all of us on board as habitual composters.

Why?

Because the breakdown of food waste in our community dumps, which totals 1/3 of all garbage by volume, is releasing an unmanageable amount of methane into the atmosphere.

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas.

Insisting that each household separates out their natural and organic materials from their regular household trash is one way to fight Climate Change, limit storage issues at our swollen landfill sites, and to call more attention to food waste in general.

But what goes in to compost?

Other than air and water (two fundamental ingredients that must be accounted for!) most natural materials can be composted, including:

  • Kitchen scraps such as coffee grounds, egg shells, and vegetable peelings
  • Natural household waste such as dryer lint, hairbrush leavings, corks, shredded newspaper and cardboard
  • Yard waste such as grass clippings, pulled weeds, leaves, straw/hay, ashes, and sawdust

And what CAN’T go in to compost?
*Everything on this list can technically be composted if a high-enough temperature is reached in the pile; that being said, these temperatures are not typically reached by home composters.

  • Meat, bones, and dairy
  • Oils and fats
  • Citrus peels (tough to break down)
  • Diseased plants, such as blight-stricken potatoes & tomatoes

Carbon vs. Nitrogen

In addition to adding organic materials to your pile, home composters must be aware of their Carbon to Nitrogen ratio.

Carbon sources include: aged (and often brown) materials, such as dried leaves, newspaper, cardboard, and egg cartons.

Nitrogen sources include: fresh (and often green) materials, such as kitchen scraps, grass clippings, manure, and coffee grounds.

The correct Carbon to Nitrogen Ration is 25:1! Though to get yourself started, try to make sure that you are at least adding equal parts of both, and adjust for the following scenarios:

Too much carbon will make your compost take longer (this is my main problem!).

Too much nitrogen makes for a stinky pile, as the excess nitrogen is released as ammonia (most common problem).

Compost Containers and Pick-Ups

Generally, composting at home involves managing two separate containers; a small countertop collector and a larger, outdoor receptacle.

Indoor Composting Containers:
Countertop pails come with or without a filter for managing odor issues. I gave up on the filter long ago – it seemed both ineffective and messy.

I manage the ‘smell’ by making daily trips to one of my outdoor composters.

Outdoor Composting Containers:
Choices here include freestanding piles, circular caged piles, DIY pallet structures, and a variety of spinning barrel composters that can be built or assembled from a kit.

For folks living in apartments or other situations that are less compost-friendly, services are popping up to help relieve some of the burden.

For a reasonable fee, a company will pick up your scraps (usually in a 5 gallon bucket), replacing your dirty, full container with a clean one.

They may even drop off ‘finished compost’ should you need some!

Winter and Worms (Vermiculture)

Liz’s main question around composting is “What happens in the wintertime?”

And the short answer is – nothing!

Keep on composting – rain, shine, in hot weather, or even in the bitter, snowy cold!

Come spring, your pile will ‘catch up’ again. In fact, if you’re using a spinning composter, you may be generating enough heat to create beautiful compost throughout the ‘off season’.

Vermicompost

A really popular composting method is Worm Composting, aka vermiculture or vermicomposting.

Essentially, little red worms will eat through your kitchen scraps and newspaper, leaving behind their ‘castings’, which are infamous for their transformative powers in garden soil.

Worm composting is awesome – I’ve visited a decent-sized operation here in Vermont and I love everything about it. Unfortunately, when the cold weather arrives, you need to protect your worms by bringing them indoors.

Heated garages, basements, sheds and the like can all provide the minimum temperature necessary for your worms to continue eating and pooping, giving you a 365 day composting operation.

At my house, I have no way to meet these minimum temperatures and have not figured out how to keep worms!

How to Compost the Easy Way

We’ve finally arrived at the ‘easy’ part – a method of composting so simple that anybody can make it happen!

Trench composting is simply burying kitchen scraps and yard waste directly into your garden.

All that you need to do to improve your garden soil is to dig a trench that you’ll fill with compost ingredients, back fill it with some of the soil that you’ve removed, and walk away!

My dad has been doing this for most of my life. He just digs a hole, buries his ‘compostables’ and counts on the fact that by next season, his soil in that area will be greatly improved.

A great way to implement this strategy is to create trenches in your garden paths.

You can even remove the soil in the fall and add your compost materials throughout the winter, adding soil on top as you go.

Why Do You Grow Food?

In this section we ask our listeners to share why they’re growing food. This week we check back in with Jenny, who was joined by her young son in last week’s episode. While he definitely wins the cutest gardener (gargler!) award, Jenny is back with us this week to tell us more about her thoughts on the subject.

Jenny won a collection of Liz’s heirloom leafy green seeds – available on Amazon.

Thanks for reading my blog : ) I appreciate your time and wish you much success in growing healthy food!

Jenny

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Foliar Feeding Schedule for Organic Gardeners

Posted by on Oct 15, 2015 in Grow Better Greens Podcast | Comments Off on Foliar Feeding Schedule for Organic Gardeners

In this week’s episode, we’re exploring the amazing benefits of foliar feeding and sharing a schedule that works for organic gardeners. We’ll talk about when, why, how and what to spray on your veggie plants and some reasons that you might consider skipping this practice here and there. We’ll also cover the best times of day to foliar feed, the best weather, and how to handle rainy spells.

You can listen in here, or download for later here:




Foliar Feeding for Organic Gardeners



What is Foliar Feeding & Why Should I do it?
What Can I Foliar Feed My Plants and How Do I Apply the Feed?
When Should I Foliar Feed My Plants?
What’s a Good Foliar Feeding Schedule?
Why Do You Grow Food?

What is Foliar Feeding & Why Should I do it?

Foliar feeding is a method of giving extra nutrition to your plants through their leaves. The stomata in plant leaves, which are very much like the pores in human skin, can absorb liquid nutrients readily.

The best way to think about this, is to imagine yourself taking an extra daily vitamin pill or drinking a highly-nutritious shake on top of eating a healthful and balanced diet:

Foliar feeding is just that type of over-the-top nutritional care, but for plants instead of people!

Foliar feeding plants is thought to be a catalyst – the special sauce that propels your plants towards high Brix. Though it’s not a substitute for good soil nutrition, it is a great enhancer that can bring all of those famed results that high Brix offers:

  • more nutrients per calorie
  • intensified flavor
  • longer storage capacity after harvest
  • improved overall pest and disease resistance in plants

You can learn more about high Brix food and how to grow it by signing up for our free video series below.

What Can I Foliar Feed My Plants and How Do I Apply the Feed?

The two most popular foliar feed liquids to use on your plants are Compost Tea and Sea Mineral blends. Compost Tea is made in a DIY brewer or purchased as tea bags to steep in water at home.

Sea Minerals have long been lauded as a complete (and natural) trace mineral solution for plants, which also includes growth stimulants and chelating agents that help to remove dangerous heavy metals.

How cool is that?

To apply the feed, you want to mist it on leaves, paying extra attention to the back or underside of each leaf. You can also pour your diluted tea or sea minerals around the root systems of your plants; when used this way, it’s called a nutrient drench.

For small gardens, a hand-held spray bottle will generally do the trick, though they’re quick to break and can be tough for people with arthritis. Frankly, they can make anyone’s hand pretty sore!

A better solution is a pressurized sprayer. Pressurized sprayers work by pumping the solution into a tube so that an even spray is applied effortlessly, in a fine mist that is best for plant stomata. You can check out a one-gallon pressurized sprayer here.

Here’s a list of great foliar feeding nutrients to get you started:

  • Compost tea
  • MaxiCrop
  • Fox Farm Big Bloom
  • Neptune’s Harvest Fish & Seaweed Fertilizer
  • When Should I Foliar Feed My Plants?

    Stage of Life:

    You can begin misting your plants as soon as you see true leaves form (as opposed to ‘seed leaves’,) until, well, forever.

    Many gardeners only spray their plants until full maturity. This means that they stop bothering after fruits have formed and are beginning to ripen.

    Another crucial time to spray extra nutrients on your veggies is whenever they endure stress – wind, weather, temperature swings, critter attacks, clumsy gardeners tripping on vines or bruising stems.

    Spraying nutrients is a great bit of extra insurance after anything that may send a plant into shock!

    Time of Day

    The best strategy is the ‘whenever you think of it’ strategy!

    I prefer to foliar feed in the early morning or early evening when plant stomata are most open, but if I miss my preferred window, I still make sure to follow through.

    Some gardeners won’t spray liquid on plant leaves during hot, sunny periods, as they believe that every droplet will act as a magnifying glass which when paired with the sun can burn holes through the leaves.

    I’ve never had this problem and don’t think that it’s really much of an issue.

    Think about how often tropical locations get a heavy afternoon rain just before the hot sun reemerges!

    What’s a Good Foliar Feeding Schedule?

    I feed weekly, alternating different feeds in my sprayer. Usually, this means that I simply spray compost tea one week and feed sea minerals the next.

    However, results can be seen from one singular foliar feeding session. So if that’s all you’re able to do, go for it!

    Some gardeners spray their plants biweekly (every other week), while others pinpoint 4 separate occasions:

    • appearance of true leaves
    • bud formation
    • flower set
    • fruit set



    Again, it’s important to foliar feed at any sign of stress.

    Thanks for reading my blog : ) I appreciate your time and wish you much success in growing healthy food!

    Jenny

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3 Secrets to Beyond Organic Greens

Posted by on Oct 8, 2015 in Grow Better Greens Podcast | Comments Off on 3 Secrets to Beyond Organic Greens

In this week’s episode, we’re diving back into growing greens with high brix. How exactly do nutrient dense farmers pull this off? We’ll share the three things we know to be pivotal in taking a regular, organic garden and turning it into an exceptionally healthy food-growing machine!

You can listen, or download for later here:




3 Secrets to Beyond Organic Greens

Why Beyond-Organic? Revisiting Brix
Start with Soil Minerals
Protect your Work
Fortify Like a Pro
Why Do You Grow Food?

Why Beyond Organic? Revisiting Brix

We’ve used the phrase ‘Beyond Organic’ to describe this next phase of organic gardening – the phase of putting more nutrients per calorie into our veggies.

While growing organic food often involves a list of practices to avoid, such as the use of harmful herbicides and pesticides, Nutrient Dense growing is more focused on a to-do list of positive, preventative actions.

Quite like engaging in daily vitamin therapy!

The biggest problem that I see within this movement is a marketing one. We’re all using different names to describe the same process, and not a one of them is doing the movement any favors:

  • “Nutrient Dense”okay, but that term means something different to food buyers. It means following a diet rich in sweet potatoes, broccoli, berries, and salmon…
  • “High Brix”accurately describes the outcome we’re looking for, which is more overall nutrients in our food (measured via Brix) but only a tiny sliver of the population even knows what this means…
  • “Biological Farming” – while this involves the use of balancing soils with minerals, it implies a scale and attachment to science that excludes most home growers…

Start with Soil Minerals

So, whatever we call it (I’ve just been saying that I’m a Soil Mineral Gardener), our job is to understand the 3 necessary steps to growing high-Brix, nutrient dense food!

The very first step to is to test and amend your soil with minerals.

The gist of working with Soil Minerals is as follows:

Just like with human health, it’s entirely possible for a garden to receive all kinds of high quality food and nutrients while still suffering from the effects of malnutrition.

Wait…what?

Yes, it happens all of the time! Check out our free video series below to learn about how “All Disease Starts in the Gut” applies to plants as well as humans:



Until certain elements are balanced in such a way that provides the perfect environment for microorganisms to live their lives to the fullest, the nutrients our plants need will not be delivered and/or absorbed, even if they’re present!

But…What if you don’t want to or can’t amend your soil with minerals?

Does this mean that you’ll be unable to grow food with super high Brix?

I say just do the best you can and move on to steps 2 and 3. You’ll still be harvesting better food, though you may not see the highest levels of nutrients that you could be growing.

Protect Your Work

The second ‘secret’ step to growing Beyond Organic, nutrient dense, high brix food is to protect your soil.

The main reason that we’ve been collectively unable to source high quality foods over the past 30-ish years, is a result of de-mineralization.

As we humans populate the earth and make more room for our own needs (housing, energy, iPhones, laptops, etc…) we disturb natural systems and remove minerals at an alarming rate.

Even if you’re not ‘mining’ minerals directly, you’re likely losing them into the air and local waterways, as a general result of your local ecosystem having been changed through development.

Whether or not you go to the effort of replacing the minerals that may have disappeared from your own backyard, you certainly want to stop the ones you have right now from going anywhere – your garden needs them!

The best way to keep minerals put is to protect your soil from wind and water erosion by using mulch.

To learn more about how and why to use organic mulch in your home garden, check out Episode 11 of the Grow Better Greens Show.

In my opinion, mulching is non-negotiable!

Fortify Like a Pro

Here we are at the last and final step that you need to put into practice if you want to grow food with more nutrients per calorie in each and every leaf, fruit, and veggie:

Foliar Feeding!

While amending your soil is a long-term strategy (once per year over 2-5 seasons), Foliar Feeding is all about the here and now.

Think, intense vitamin therapy via an i.v. drip!

By spraying your plant leaves with a fine mist of nutrients, they’ll be absorbing the good stuff immediately through their stomata (think skin pores).

Foliar Feeding is a great practice for two important reasons:

  1. if your soil is out of balance, your plants are not getting necessary nutrients in the normal way -they need some extra help
  2. once your soil is delivering nutrients like a champ, your plants will still benefit from extra nutrition – they’re literally Mamas in the maternity ward, about to give birth to loads of little babies!

Foliar feeding is like Pre-Natal Vitamins for Plants

Next week, on Episode 20, we’re dedicating the whole show to the practice of foliar feeding your plants.

Until then, you can learn more about it in this racy post (don’t worry, it’s entirely PG!):

How to Garden Like a Pot Grower

Why Do You Grow Food?

In this section we ask our listeners to share why they’re growing food. This week Leslie Anne, a registered dietician from Tennessee shares why her family grows food.

Leslie Anne won a collection of Liz’s heirloom leafy green seeds, available on Amazon.

Thanks for reading my blog : ) I appreciate your time and wish you much success in growing healthy food!

Jenny

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